Tangy Garlic Wings from Paula Deen’s Best Dishes 2011

Hubby and I have a standing date. It happens only when we go visit his parents though. It’s inevitable that Dudette will be taken out to lunch by her grandparents and as soon as their taillights fade into the distance, we hop in the car and head to Buffalo’s. In the car, music’s turned up loud on something other than Veggie Tales and the conversation is absolutely, totally adult. Once we get to the restaurant, we order beer; in fact, we order beers. . .more than one. . .each. And, we order wings; wonderful, glorious hot, spicy wings. With no one complaining. It’s absolute heaven.

So, of course, when a magazines offers up a wing recipe, it’s hard not to jump on it and go a bit down memory lane, which is what we did last night. Paula offers a recipe for what she calls Tangy Garlic Wings. I’m here to tell you that the name is misleading. There is a teaspoon of garlic salt in the marinade and that’s the extent of the garlic. Considering that there are 2 tablespoons of Dijon mustard and 2 teaspoons of chili powder, either one of those ingredients be more appropriate in the title. Tangy Dijon Wings works.

Easy? Yes. Mix everything in a zip top bag, throw in the wings and let them marinate. Bake them at a high temperature for 30 minutes and they’re done.

However, if you pull them out of the oven after 30 minutes and expect them to look like the picture in the magazine, you’ll be disappointed. The wing tips may have that nice caramelized, charred look, but the rest of the wing will be mushy with cooked sauce. Absolutely unappealing. I ended up raising the oven rack a few notches and putting the pans under the broiler.

It was a great idea, right up until the moment when I realized that the wings were sitting on parchment. . .paper. Underneath a broiler. The epiphany presented itself in the form of flames. Luckily, when I took the tray out, all I had to do was take it to the sink and let the juices in the pan drain over the burning paper to put it out. Yes, the recipe creates so much juice that the wings, which should be nice and crispy, were swimming in it.

Pyrotechnics aside, this meal was a disappointment on many levels. The small amount of seasoning wasn’t enough to cover up the cup of ketchup and that is what we mainly tasted. Even with the broiling, the skin of the wings was soggy, not crisp. Quite a let down for the two of us and not a good introduction to eating wings for Dudette.

If I were to even bother attempting this again, I would definitely use foil instead of parchment paper and would put some racks on the baking sheets and then the chicken on those so they’re not laying in all that juice. I would also make sure to allow for some broiling time. And, the spicing would need bumped up; a lot.

So, unfortunately, this was a bust for us. We’ll stick with Buffalo’s for now. Do you have a favorite wing place or a great recipe?

Tangy Garlic Wings
from Paula Deen’s Best Dishes 2011

1 cup ketchup
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon garlic salt
2 dashes hot sauce
4 1/2 pounds chicken wings

In a large zip top bag, combine all the ingredients except the wings and squish them around to mix well. Add the wings and make sure they are all coated with the marinade. Seal and chill in the refrigerator for 4 hours.

Preheat oven to 400. Line rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Place the chicken in a single layer on the baking sheets and brush with the marinade left in the bag, discarding any that’s not used. ¬†Bake for 30 minutes, or until fully cooked.

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