Peach Crumble Pie from Everyday Food Magazine, July/August 2011

After I’ve gone through a magazine, there are always tabs left; paper reminders of recipes that I didn’t have time to get to. They hang around in the recesses of my mind, whispering ‘hello’ once in a while. It’s because of this that I’ve created Turn Back Time Tuesday. It’s a chance to go pull out an old magazine and make one of those recipes that doesn’t deserve to be forgotten. Care to join me?

My daughter is outside riding her bike in the driveway. When I glance out there, I see the top of her Spiderman helmet bobbing with ponytail swinging beneath it and her skinned, scabbed knees pumping away.

Every once in a while she stops to ‘check’ on her bike. She’ll give the screws a pretend turn, tug on the spokes and perform other kinds of maintenance in her mind that I can only guess about. Then she scratches. A mosquito bite on the arm, another one or two on the calf.

Finally, in the manner that only a child who cares nothing about whether anyone is looking will do, she pulls out her wedgie and climbs back on the bike to ride a bit more.

For a few minutes, I sit back in my chair, leave the computer and adulthood behind and relive being six again through her youthful imagination and lack of self consciousness.

Then I want pie.

The Process

Martha’s crust is and always has been amazing. I love the fact that it’s done in the food processor. I love the fact that, when I cut into it, it flakes apart in such a satisfying way. If I had to choose between this one and null, I’d be hard pressed to do so. They’re both fantastic and easy.

The rest is cake; well, pie. Cut peaches; toss them with flour and sugar. Mix crumble ingredients, leaving large clumps. Of course, that never works for me because the butter melts and I don’t end up with clumps, just delicious ooze. I think that’s more a result of my working the crumble as much as I should so that the butter/flour/sugar/oats create combined lumps. I don’t know.

If you have an answer, please share.

The Verdict

Once again we have a dessert that received hearty thumbs-up from all three family members. Hubby and Dudette like it just as it was, though Dudette was more focused on the crumble, crust and ice cream than the actual fruit.

I thought it was very, very good, but I would have liked a little zing to the filling. I found it to be rather sweet. Still though, sweet isn’t bad and I will take fruit pies over just about any sweet treat that doesn’t have the word cheesecake in it.

What I’d Do Different Next Time

I’d add a half teaspoon or so of lemon to the filling to balance the sweetness of the peaches and sugar and a little salt to the crumble to also give a little break to the sweetness.

Peach Crumble Pie from Everyday Food Magazine, July/August 2011
 
Prep time
Cook time
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Reviewed by:
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Serves: 8
Ingredients
For The Crust:
  • 1¼ cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for rolling
  • ¼ teaspoon fine salt
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • ½ cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
For The Filling:
  • 3 pounds peaches, halved, pitted, and cut into ½-inch slices (8 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons light-brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
For The Crumble:
  • ⅓ cup packed light-brown sugar
  • ⅓ cup all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled)
  • ⅓ cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
Instructions
  1. Make crust: In a food processor, pulse flour, salt, and granulated sugar until combined. Add butter; pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal, with a few pea-size pieces of butter remaining. Sprinkle with 3 tablespoons ice water. Pulse until dough is crumbly but holds together when squeezed (if necessary, add up to 2 tablespoons ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time); do not overmix. Form dough into a disk, wrap tightly in plastic, and refrigerate until firm, at least 1 hour (or up to overnight).
  2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly flour a rolling pin and work surface and roll out dough to a 12-inch round. Place in a 9-inch pie plate, fold overhang under, and crimp edges. Make filling: In a large bowl, toss together peaches, brown sugar, and flour until combined. Make crumble: In a small bowl, combine brown sugar, flour, and oats; using your hands, work in butter until large clumps form.
  3. Transfer peach filling to pie shell, then sprinkle crumble evenly over top. Place pie on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until juices are bubbling and topping is golden, 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack 1½ hours before serving.
What I'd Do Different Next Time
I'd add a half teaspoon or so of lemon to the filling to balance the sweetness of the peaches and sugar and a little salt to the crumble to also give a little break to the sweetness.

 

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Buffalo Chicken Thighs from Martha Stewart's Everyday Food Magazine, July 2011

Hubby and I have a standing date that takes place every three to four months. We grab Dudette, pack a few bags and head to Wilmington; the one with beaches like Carolina, Kure and Wrightsville. Our date doesn’t include visiting any of those beaches, swimming in the surf or even catching a glimpse of the ocean. Instead, we drop Dudette off at her grandparents house and head for Buffalo’s for a few mugs Yuengling on draft, a basket of onion rings and several varieties of their incredible wings.

That’s just about the only time we have wings because, well, I do try to avoid deep frying foods at home. My arteries, posterior and general health all thank me (usually). I know that wings can be baked in the oven and grilled outside, but I admit it; I’m a fan of a good, deep-fried wing that’s then been tossed in a fantastic glaze. Plus, there’s the whole Yuengling on tap thing going on.

So, if Martha had offered up a recipe for buffalo chicken wings, I might have tried it, but with no expectations of it being as good as our date wings. Instead, she takes the buffalo idea to the rest of the bird and serves up buffalo taste in the more meaty thigh. Worth a try, thinks I.

The Process

If you have the magazine, you already know that what I’m making is only half of the original recipe. The whole thing is Buffalo Chicken Thighs with Celery and Blue Cheese Salad. Since I’m the only one in the house that likes blue cheese dressing, I decided to forego that salad for the Chopped Green Bean and Celery Salad. If you’re wanting the blue cheese dressing, you’ll need to get the magazine.

Making the chicken is easy. Salt, pepper and a sprinkle of cayenne is all that goes on it before it’s put in a hot oven for a half hour or so. Because we’re dealing with the more fatty thigh and the heat is so high, the skin gets very crispy, which is really important when making any buffalo-style dish.

While the chicken bakes, it’s time to make the glaze, which involves heating butter, cayenne, vinegar, salt and pepper in a small saucepan.

Once the chicken’s done, it gets tossed in a bowl with the butter mixture and that’s it.

The Verdict

Way hot. Way too hot for me. I wouldn’t even let Dudette try it. She had a piece that just had been baked with salt and pepper. Hubby, on the other hand, he loved this. He loved the butter sauce too. He ended up pouring on his potatoes. Remember though, he has a sinus infection and so his taste buds are working at half strength. For all we know, he could have fried the inside of his mouth and we won’t find out until he gets on the right meds.

This is very hot, but it is also very tasty. I admit that I didn’t coat my chicken thigh with the butter sauce. I did sprinkle it with the cayenne, but then I just dipped a piece in the sauce to see what I thought. The flavor is good, but I just haven’t developed that level of heat tolerance.

What I’d Do Different Next Time

Instead of using cayenne pepper, I’d add a good hot sauce with the butter instead. The cayenne never integrated at all and so the coating left places that were incredibly hot, and others that were just very hot. I think a liquid hot sauce would provide a more even coating. Serving this with some kind of “mouth cooler,” like Celery and Blue Cheese Salad that should be with this or the green bean salad I used is a must.

Buffalo Chicken Thighs from Martha Stewart's Everyday Food Magazine, July 2011
 
Prep time
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Total time
 
Reviewed by:
Recipe type: Meat
Cuisine: American
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 1½ pounds total)
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1¼ teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 5 tablespoons white-wine vinegar
  • 3 ounces blue cheese, crumbled (3/4 cup)
  • 3 large celery stalks, cut into ¼-inch pieces
  • 1 head romaine lettuce, cut into ½-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Place chicken, skin side up, on a rimmed baking sheet and season with salt, pepper, and ½ teaspoon cayenne. Cook until skin is golden and crisp and chicken is cooked through, 20 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and half the blue cheese. Add celery and romaine, season with salt and pepper, and toss to combine. Sprinkle salad with remaining blue cheese.
  2. In a small pot, melt butter with ¾ teaspoon cayenne over medium-low. Whisk in 3 tablespoons vinegar and remove from heat; season with salt and pepper. In a medium bowl, toss chicken with butter mixture to coat. Divide chicken among four plates, drizzle with any extra butter mixture, and serve with salad.
What I'd Do Different Next Time
Instead of using cayenne pepper, I'd add a good hot sauce with the butter instead. The cayenne never integrated at all and so the coating left places that were incredibly hot, and others that were just very hot. I think a liquid hot sauce would provide a more even coating. Serving this with some kind of "mouth cooler," like Celery and Blue Cheese Salad that should be with this or the green bean salad I used is a must.