Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread

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Chuck roast becomes fork tender as it simmers in a hearty gravy with carrots and onions in this perfect-for-fall Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread dish.

Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread | www.takingonmagazines.com | Chuck roast becomes fork tender as it simmers in a hearty gravy with carrots and onions in this perfect-for-fall Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread dish.

I think having a middle schooler has created a time vortex over my house because it’s definitely sped up for me.

Just last week this young lady of mine was a preschooler who insisted on ‘helping’ with this site by doing video reviews of the dishes she ate. Today, she rolls her eyes if she finds out I’ve mentioned her and¬†hates being when I post her on my social media even though she’s a selfie queen on her own Snapchat and Instagram accounts (both are private so she’s not ‘findable’).

Yesterday, it was the middle of summer and we were eating watermelon, fresh corn on the cob and peaches that were picked the day before. Not anymore. The stone fruit have been replaced by apples, the watermelon’s spot is taken up with piles of pumpkins and I won’t even mention that I’ve seen hints of orange and red on the maples and oaks in my yard.

My magazines are well into transition mode too. You’ve noticed it, right? Light salads have taken a back seat to dishes featuring the aforementioned apples and pumpkins, and, of course, stews. Glorious stews.

The Process

Forty minutes of active prep time? Spot on. Most of it is spent before any cooking begins, cubing the chuck roast, cleaning and quartering the mushrooms, peeling and slicing carrots and chopping up the garlic. I did all these things, as well as measuring out flour, beef, and beef stock so I wouldn’t have to leave the stove once the cooking began.

I heated my oil in the Dutch oven (it calls for cast iron but any good sturdy pot will do) and added the beef. It browned quickly so I threw in the vegetables and let them cook for a few minutes. I was a bit concerned about the fact that there wasn’t any liquid added to help them soften, but the thawed onions released a good amount to help with that.

I sprinkled the flour over everything, added the garlic and stirred until the vegetables and meat were coated. Then I added the beef, stock and seasoning, brought the contents to a boil, reduced the heat, put a lid on the pot and walked away for an hour and a half.

When we were close to eating, I rubbed a slices of sourdough with cut garlic clove, let butter melt in a skillet, then toasted the bread in it.

All in all, it took a bit of time, but it was easy work.

The Verdict

This stew might just make it a little easier for me to begin to say good-bye to summer and hello to fall. The beef was fork-tender and the vegetables perfectly cooked. The beer-infused gravy was rich, thick and delicious. Despite the fact that there wasn’t an herb to be found (I don’t think I’ve every had a beef stew without bay leaf in it), it was fantastic. We all thought so and gave it two thumbs up.

The only improvement (in my book) would be a big bowl of mashed potatoes to serve with the stew.

The garlic bread was also wonderful. How could bread cooked in butter be anything but? Two things to note though. Next time I make this I won’t slice the garlic clove horizontally. I’d take a bit off one end, rub a slice of bread, then cut off a bit more, and more, as I go on rubbing. Doing that would allow more garlic flavor to infuse the bread. I would also wipe the skillet between batches. The browned drippings and bits of bread from the first batch of toast turned subsequent batches an odd brown color instead of keeping the same golden brown of the first. It’s easily fixed with a quick swipe of a paper towel.

What I’d Do Different Next Time

Next time I make this I won’t slice the garlic clove lengthwise. I’d take a bit off one end, rub a slice of bread, then cut off a bit more, and more, as I go on rubbing. Doing that would allow more garlic flavor to infuse the bread. I would also wipe the skillet between batches. The browned drippings and bits of bread from the first batch of toast turned subsequent batches an odd brown color instead of keeping the same golden brown of the first. It’s easily fixed with a quick swipe of a paper towel.

The Cost

Chuck roast: $13.98
Cremeni mushrooms: $3.69
Carrots: $1.89
Pearl onions: $2.65
Brown ale beer: $7.99
Beef stock: $3.35
Sourdough bread: $4.49

Total: $38.04

Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread Recipe

Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Reviewed by:
Recipe type: Stew
Cuisine: American
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 pounds boneless chuck roast, cut into ¾-inch pieces
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, divided
  • 12 ounces cremini mushrooms, quartered
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 1½ cups frozen pearl onions, thawed
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons chopped garlic (about 2 garlic cloves)
  • ¾ cup brown ale beer
  • 3 cups unsalted beef stock
  • 6 sourdough bread slices
  • 1 large garlic clove, halved lengthwise
  • ¼ cup salted butter
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in a large cast-iron Dutch oven over medium-high. Add beef, and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon of the salt and ½ teaspoon of the pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until browned on all sides, about 6 minutes.
  2. Add mushrooms, carrots, and onions, and cook over medium-high, stirring often, until vegetables begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Add flour and garlic, and cook, stirring constantly, 1 minute. Add beer, and simmer until reduced by about half, about 2 minutes. Add stock and remaining 1 teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer until beef is very tender, about 1½ hours.
  3. Rub both sides of sourdough bread slices with cut sides of garlic clove. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high. Once butter begins to foam, add 3 bread slices, turning immediately to ensure both sides are coated with melted butter. Cook until bottom is golden, about 1 minute. Turn bread slice, and cook until bottom is golden, about 1 minute. Repeat with remaining 2 tablespoons butter and 3 bread slices. Serve Buttery Garlic Bread immediately with Beef Stew.
What I'd Do Different Next Time
Next time I make this I won't slice the garlic clove lengthwise. I'd take a bit off one end, rub a slice of bread, then cut off a bit more, and more, as I go on rubbing. Doing that would allow more garlic flavor to infuse the bread. I would also wipe the skillet between batches. The browned drippings and bits of bread from the first batch of toast turned subsequent batches an odd brown color instead of keeping the same golden brown of the first. It's easily fixed with a quick swipe of a paper towel.

 

One thought on “Beef Stew with Buttery Garlic Bread

  • September 22, 2017 at 9:42 am
    Permalink

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    Reply

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